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Glance AT A GLANCE:

  • Hepatitis A, hepatitis B, polio, tetanus, and typhoid vaccines recommended
  • Japanese encephalitis and rabies recommended for other areas
  • No yellow fever vaccination
  • Daily anti-malaria medication needed for some areas

QuestionChina commonly asked questions

Which areas do New Yorkers visit most?

New Yorkers most visit Beijing, Guangzhou, Shanghai, and Tianjin.

Beijing, or Peking, is in the northeast of China. It is the nation's capital, center of politics. Due to its long history Beijing has withstanding architecture such as temples and gardens, while also providing modern-day attractions such as theaters, concerts, museums, and universities.

Guangzhou is a commercial port in southeast China. The city has a unique mix of cultures, and half its population speaks Mandarin and the other half Cantonese. Among the cities best attractions are the Eight Sights of Guangzhou, named over a period of centuries, including sights such as Baiyun Mountain.

Shanghai can be found along China's east coast and is the most populated city in the world. As such it is a very fast-paced city, a financial and cultural hub. Amidst a large assortment of activities such as museums, art, and theater, plenty of historical sights can be found in Shanghai.

Tianjin is on the coast of northeast China. Its position on the sea has made Tianjin an important industrial port and many pass through the city on the way to Beijing. Besides natural beauty and a wide array of activities, food, and nightlife, Tianjin's attractions include the Huangyagua Pass on the Great Wall of China

Should I receive any vaccinations prior to my trip, and if so, when?

Yes. The Center for Disease Control suggests that travelers to those areas receive hepatitis A, hepatitis B, typhoid, polio and tetanus vaccinations. In addition, travelers to some rural areas should receive Japanese encephalitis and rabies vaccines. Ideally these vaccinations are received two months in advance, although the vaccinations can have some effect in shorter time.

You do not need a yellow fever vaccination if traveling to China from the U.S.

Is it legal to not receive the vaccines?

It is legal to not receive the vaccines, although receiving the vaccines is the safest option and is recommended by the Center for Disease Control.

How long do these vaccinations last?

Hepatitis

There are two types of hepatitis shots, hepatitis A and hepatitis B. While children often receive hepatitis B vaccination, hepatitis A is only given to international travelers.

    Hepatitis A
  • one shot lasts for one year
  • two shots last for life
    Hepatitis B
  • three shots for lifetime immunity

Polio

  • consists of four shots (often received by children)
  • one booster required after age of 21

Tetanus

  • one shot lasts for ten years

Typhoid

  • one shot lasts for two years

The following vaccines should only be received if deemed necessary for your trip by a doctor:

Japanese encephalitis

  • two shots last for five years

Rabies

  • three shots last for two years

What if I do not remember which vaccines I've received?

If you are unsure which vaccinations you've received, get the vaccines again before your trip. As revaccination cannot harm you, it is the best choice to ensure your protection.

Do I need malaria medication?

Within China, few places have a risk of malaria transmission. These risk locations are listed here by the CDC:Click Here

If you are visiting any of these places, you should take anti-malaria medication.

What malaria medications are available?

Two medications are available: Malarone and Doxycycline. Both are taken daily beginning three days before the trip. After the trip, Malarone should be taken for seven days while Doxycyline should be taken for 30 days. For this reason Doxycyline is the cheaper option and the most popular choice among uninsured patients. Insurance most likely covers either option.

What else should I bring on my trip to China?

Cipro, an antibiotic medication, should be carried while in China, as well as an anti-diarrheal such as Imodium. A sunscreen of at least SPF 15 should be brought, as well as a good insect repellent. A good insect repellent has a DEET concentration of 30-50% and can help avoid contact with disease-carrying insects.

How else can I stay safe in China?

Don't swim in stillwater, with the exception of chlorinated swimming pools, as East Asian freshwater can house diseases such as schistosomiasis. You also should not consume tap water or tap water-containing consumables such as ice cubes and fountain drinks as to avoid contamination, and only eat well-cooked foods. If you do get sick or injured while in China head to a doctor as soon as possible in order to ensure that your situation can be properly monitored.

What will be discussed at the travel consultation?

During the travel health consultation our doctors will review your immunization record and your travel plans, informing you of any health risks and which vaccines and medications you should consider receiving. After the consultation you can decide what you would like to receive.

Credit cards
  • Yellow fever
  • Typhoid (shot)
  • Typhoid (oral)
  • Hepatitis A
  • Hepatitis B
  • Hep A/B (combo)
  • Tetanus(TDAP)
  • Polio
  • Meningitis
  • Rabies
  • Japanese Encephalitis
  • $190
  • $88
  • $110
  • $88
  • $80
  • $120
  • $78
  • $68
  • $138
  • $330
  • $330
Pay cash and save 8%
  • Yellow fever
  • Typhoid (shot)
  • Typhoid (oral)
  • Hepatitis A
  • Hepatitis B
  • Hep A/B (combo)
  • Tetanus(TDAP)
  • Polio
  • Meningitis
  • Rabies
  • Japanese Encephalitis
  • $175
  • $80
  • $100
  • $80
  • $74
  • $110
  • $70
  • $60
  • $127
  • $303
  • $303

One-time office-visit fee of $65*

Office visit covers administration of all vaccines and prescriptions