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Glance AT A GLANCE:

  • CDC Recommended
  • Danger zones: Many countries in South East Asia, South America, and Africa. Click here for more information
  • Transmission via food and water
  • 97% protection with first shot
  • Two shots equals a lifetime of protection

We all want to be protected when we travel. Learning more about Hepatitis A vaccination is an important first step.

Here are some of the most common questions we hear people ask about it. We hope you find the answers helpful

QuestionBefore getting Hepatitis A vaccine

What is Hepatitis A and what are its symptoms?

It is a serious viral infection of the liver. It is spread via food and drink and through person-to-person contact.

Symptoms include sudden fever, discomfort, loss of appetite, nausea, and dark urine. Symptoms typically last 2 weeks, with complete recovery taking up to 8 weeks.

Approximately 1in 5 individuals with Hepatitis A will need to hospitalized. Infected individuals are commonly too ill to work for up to a month, and severe infections can result in death.

Where and how common is it?

The Indian subcontinent, the Far East, parts of South America, Africa, and Eastern Europe.

Map

What protection is available?

Hepatitis A single vaccine (shot) should be given at least 2 weeks before travelling (Ninety percent immunity occurs in 2 weeks.) but can be given up to the day of departure.

Antibodies may not be detectable for 12-15 days post vaccination; however the vaccine may provide some protection before antibodies can be detected.

Full vaccination(lifetime) consist of 2 doses (injections) 6-12 months apart

Who should receive vaccine?

Anyone traveling to high risk areas (Indian subcontinent, the far East, and Eastern Europe) particularly if sanitation and food hygiene is likely to be poor.

Individuals with chronic liver disease, as they tend to be at risk.

The vaccine is not considered necessary for individuals traveling to Northern or Western Europe (including Spain, Portugal, and Italy) or North America, Australia, and New Zealand.

Have I received it before?

Unlikely unless you traveled abroad since it is not a routine vaccine in the United States. If you have received a Hepatitis vaccine it was probably to protect against Hepatitis B.

Is it covered by insurance?

Unlikely. We do not accept insurance for this vaccine.

Is it a required vaccine?

It is not required. It is highly recommended by CDC.

Who should not receive it?

Individuals with a high fever and those who have suffered a severe reaction to a previous dose of the vaccine.

Are there any side effects post immunization?

Only mild side effects are typical. These include redness and/or swelling at the injection site. This usually disappears and is of no consequence.

Are there other ways to protect against Hepatitis A?

Eat only freshly prepared foods served piping hotorfreshly peeled fruits such as bananas or mangos. Drink only bottled water or cooled boiled water and/or pasteurized milk. When drinking water, choose sparkling to ensure seal has not been broken and bottle has not been refilled.

Wash hands frequently, before and after eating and preparing food, and after using toilet.

Credit cards
  • Yellow fever
  • Typhoid (shot)
  • Typhoid (oral)
  • Hepatitis A
  • Hepatitis B
  • Hep A/B (combo)
  • Tetanus(TDAP)
  • Polio
  • Meningitis
  • Rabies
  • Japanese Encephalitis
  • $190
  • $88
  • $110
  • $88
  • $80
  • $120
  • $78
  • $68
  • $138
  • $330
  • $330
Pay cash and save 8%
  • Yellow fever
  • Typhoid (shot)
  • Typhoid (oral)
  • Hepatitis A
  • Hepatitis B
  • Hep A/B (combo)
  • Tetanus(TDAP)
  • Polio
  • Meningitis
  • Rabies
  • Japanese Encephalitis
  • $175
  • $80
  • $100
  • $80
  • $74
  • $110
  • $70
  • $60
  • $127
  • $303
  • $303

One-time office-visit fee of $65*

Office visit covers administration of all vaccines and prescriptions